Bringing maps into the fray.

Bringing maps into the fray.

Bringing maps into the fray.

Mission: Responder was part of a refocused initiative by Esri to bring geospatial technology into first-response and field-intelligence workflows.


Up until recently, our product offerings could be configured and extended to support such workflows, but not to the degree that Responder set out to do. This initiative, which became known around Esri as “Situational Awareness” generated a mobile app that provides a live picture of mission operations in the field, and the ability to communicate around it.

Drop pin add point

STEPS WE TOOK TO KICK THINGS OFF

  1. Determine the target user
  2. Establish user story
  3. Define a happy path and validate it, using sketches and user interviews
  4. Interaction designs for the happy path
  5. The high fidelity design vision
usecases

So many situational use-cases,

so little time.

When it came to industries we wanted to target, there was no shortage of spy agencies, task forces, EMT units, or disaster response organizations to work with. The trick was picking a handful of use-cases early, and building flexibility into the initial designs so our designs could scale with our user base.

So many situational use-cases,

so little time.


When it came to industries we wanted to target, there was no shortage of spy agencies, task forces, EMT units, or disaster response organizations to work with. The trick was picking a handful of use-cases early, and building flexibility into the initial designs so our designs could scale with our user base.

So many situational use-cases, so little time.

When it came to industries we wanted to target, there was no shortage of spy agencies, task forces, EMT units, or disaster response organizations to work with. The trick was picking a handful of use-cases early, and building flexibility into the initial designs so our designs could scale with our user base.

Step 1

STEP 1: DETERMINE TARGET USER

Working with product management, we developed a control-questionnaire for customer interviews. These would help us determine the users to design for.


After some analysis, we went with the FBI’s “CIRG” unit — the FBI response team that typically works with local law enforcement in SWAT-based scenarios.


Choosing this user meant that we would not only support their workflows, but also the departments that they partner with in the field…thus giving us a nice “umbrella” user-story we could leverage to stay mindful of other future users.

step 2

STEP 2: ESTABLISH USER STORY

Using the Google Ventures design sprint model, a multi-functional team descended on one of our R&D centers and spent the week building consensus around the workflow and the initial designs/prototypes.


After some deliberation, we chose to focus on the FBI CIRG’s coverage of the Boston Marathon bombing. We had done a significant amount of research on the bombing of 2013 and used it as the backdrop for our workflow design.

step3

STEP 3: DEFINE HAPPY PATH AND VALIDATE IT

The following is a workflow we put together and validated with the user.

The Happy Path workflow

Then we went a few rounds on sketches.

Then we went a few rounds on sketches.

Then we went a few rounds on sketches.

sketches
Step 4

STEP 4: INTERACTION DESIGNS FOR HAPPY PATH

After we galvanized around a specific set of sketches, design then went back and generated some mid-fidelity interaction designs, and presented these back to the wider group for verification. The following are some examples of these mid-fidelity designs. We also used these in more customer interviews to validate usefulness and usability, and slightly changed the content of the story per their request.

Workflow
step 5

STEP 5: HIGH FIDELITY DESIGNS

These are high fidelity designs I created for the future UI of the product. While this product was specifically built for Android users, I’ve been visioning a new mobile design language that can work cross-platform for iOS as well. Here is a sampling of the first iteration of this system in light and dark modes.

hifi1
hifi2

Other artifacts:

5b.2 FAB tapped, markup mode initiated
Activity Feed
Responder – Key Workflows – Drop a pin, add to map, broadcast
Messages in SA App – Page 1 (3) (1)
IMG_B3D57312DFB6-1 (1)
IMG_9F2E08E0BAA1-1 (1)
journey map
design sprint sketch
Add to map
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